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2014 Panels

MODERATORS & PANELISTS

Panel 1: Policy and Security Issues

Moderator: Brian Weeden, Secure World Foundation

Mr. Weeden is the Technical Advisor for Secure World Foundation and has 15 years of professional experience in the national and international space security arena. He is a leader for providing critical analysis that supports development of space policy. Prior to joining SWF, Mr. Weeden served nine years on active duty as an officer in the United States Air Force. As part of U.S. Strategic Command's Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC), Mr. Weeden directed the orbital analyst training program and developed tactics, techniques and procedures for improving space situational awareness. In his current role as Technical Advisor, Mr. Weeden conducts research on space debris, global space situational awareness, space traffic management, protection of space assets, and space governance. He is currently Vice-Chair of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Space Security. Mr. Weeden's research and analysis have been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, National Public Radio, USA Today, The BBC, Fox News, China Radio International, The Economist, The World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting in Davos, academic journals, presentations to the United Nations, and testimony before the U.S. Congress.

Panelists

Josef Koller
Space Policy Advisor
Office of the Secretary of Defense

Dr. Koller is a space policy advisor at the Office of the Secretary of Defense. In this position, he serves as a thought-leader and senior staff analyst responsible for providing technical advice and analyzing space-related United States Government and DoD policy matters. He directly supports key international strategy efforts in order to implement the President's National Space Policy and the Secretary's National Security Space. Prior to this assignment, Dr. Koller was co-leading the Space Science and Applications Development Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory and is the founder of the Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School. At Los Alamos, he developed novel data assimilation and machine learning techniques and holds a US patent in space weather modeling in decisional time frames. Dr. Koller is a topical editor for the Journal of Geoscientific Model Development and received his Ph.D. in Astrophysics from Rice University in 2004.

 

Pamela Whitney
Minority Professional Staff, Space Subcommittee
House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology

Ms. Pamela Whitney serves as Minority Professional Staff on the Space Subcommittee of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, where she supports Committee oversight and NASA Authorization activities on U.S. civil space and aeronautics programs, and commercial space. Most recently, she supported Democratic members in the House passage of the bipartisan 2014 NASA Authorization bill. Prior to joining the Committee staff in 2007, Ms. Whitney served as Senior Program Officer at the Space Studies Board of the National Academies where she directed studies and workshops to assess science, policy, and international aspects of space science and Earth science programs, and served as the Executive Secretary of the U.S. national committee to the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) of the International Council for Science (ICSU). She also held previous positions in aerospace consulting and publishing. Pamela holds a B.A. in Economics from Smith College and an M.A. in International Communication from American University. She is a member of the International Academy of Astronautics.

Thomas Cremins
Senior Advisor to the NASA Administrator for Policy and Strategy Implementation
NASA Headquarters

Mr. Cremins has worked in a range of critical and leading edge governmental and executive assignments since joining the Federal workforce in 1991. Over his career, he has consistently linked space to national and global interests and issues. He currently serves as the Senior Advisor to the NASA Administrator for Policy and Strategy Implementation. Among his previous assignments, he led NASA’s international negotiations on human spaceflight; overall Agency assessments and studies; inter-agency policy efforts; and served twice as a Fellow on the Senate Commerce Committee where he played an instrumental role in the development and passage of the 2005 and 2010 NASA Authorization Acts.

 

 

Richard Buenneke
Senior Advisor, Space Policy
U.S. Department of State

Mr. Buenneke advises senior State Department officials on the planning and implementation of diplomatic and public diplomacy activities relating to U.S. national security space policy. He also serves as the co-chair of an international expert group on space debris, space operations and tools for collaborative space situational awareness, which was established in 2011 as part of a United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space working group on the long-term sustainability of outer space activities. Before joining the State Department, Mr. Buenneke was a senior policy analyst at The Aerospace Corporation, where he supported innovative public-private partnerships for enhancing the mission assurance and resilience of commercial space capabilities. He holds a Bachelor’s degrees in economics and systems engineering from the Wharton and Engineering schools of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Buenneke also holds Masters’ degrees in policy analysis from George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs and the Pardee RAND Graduate School.


Panel 2: Technology Issues

Moderator: Marshall H. Kaplan, CODER Associate Director, University of Maryland

Dr. Kaplan is a Visiting Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Associate Director of CODER. He is an expert in space flight technologies, orbital mechanics and space debris issues. In fact, he was the first to study space junk retrieval and was instrumental in the safe reentry of the Skylab Space Station in 1979. He has over four decades of academic and industrial experience, having served as Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University and presented hundreds of courses on space technology and systems. In addition to publishing over 100 papers, reports and articles on aerospace technologies, he is the author of several books, including the internationally used text, Modern Spacecraft Dynamics and Control. Dr. Kaplan is a Fellow of the AIAA and a member of the AIAA Technical Committee on Space Transportation. He holds advanced degrees from MIT and Stanford University.

Panelists

Joseph A. Carroll
President of Tether Applications, Inc.
Chula Vista, Calif.

Mr. Carroll has been involved in space research since 1982, mostly related to use of long tethers in orbit. He proposed the Small Expendable Deployment System (SEDS) and developed it under SBIR and follow-on funding.  This led to the 20 km SEDS-1 and -2 tether experiments in 1993 and 1994, deployment of a 500m wire on the Plasma Motor Generator experiment in 1993, and deployment of NRL's 4 km TiPS tether in 1996.  The SEDS-2 tether was cut 4 days after launch, and TiPS after 10 years.  So he has more reason than most people to be concerned about damage from hypervelocity impact.  Most of his recent work has been on the EDDE tether system, which you will be hearing more about later, from Jerome Pearson.

 

W. Daniel Williams
Director, Busek Corp.

Dr. Williams is Director of Business Development at Busek, a satellite propulsion systems company. Before coming to Busek, Dr. Williams consulted with several companies in space communications, power, and propulsion. While at NASA he was a Distinguished Research Associate working on space communications, electronic devices, sensors and instrumentation. He holds the Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in physics from Purdue University.

 

Kaushik A. Iyer
Materials Physicist and Section Supervisor
Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory

Mr. Iyer is a Materials Physicist and Section Supervisor in the Space Exploration Sector at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland. He chairs the session Space Debris and Dust: The Environment, Risks, and Mitigation Concepts and Practices annually at the IEEE Aerospace Conference in Big Sky, Montana. He and his colleagues have published extensively in recent years on cosmic dust shielding work for the NASA Solar Probe Plus and New Horizons missions, which integrates spacecraft systems engineering, mission operations, planetary science, hypervelocity impact shock physics and materials design. More generally, Kaushik develops new programs and provides in-depth technical expertise relating to material response modeling in space and aero environments. He holds a Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from Vanderbilt University and B. Tech. in Metallurgical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, and is a licensed Professional Mechanical Engineer in Maryland.

Claude R. Phipps
Photonic Associates, LLC

Dr. Phipps earned B.S. and M.S. degrees at MIT, and a Ph.D. in plasma physics at Stanford University in 1972. His thesis work was on the first laser‐plasma interaction experiment at Stanford. He worked at Livermore until 1974, then at Los Alamos on the laser program until 1995. He then formed Photonic Associates to investigate laser ablation propulsion. He has developed several models for predicting laser momentum coupling, and invented the "ORION" and “L’ADROIT” concepts for laser space debris reentry and the laser plasma thruster. He is author of over 100 journal publications and is Chair of the Biennial Symposia on High Power Laser Ablation in Santa Fe.

 

Kartik Kumar
Dinamica Srl in Milan, Italy

Mr. Kumar, completed his Bachelors and Masters in Aerospace Engineering at Delft University of Technology, where he is finalizing a Ph.D. on the dynamics of Uranus' outer ring system. He is currently employed as Senior Engineer at Dinamica Srl in Milan, Italy, where he is primarily responsible for space debris research within the context of the Stardust network. He is the principal architect of Tudat, a set of open-source, C++ libraries for astrodynamics modeling and simulation. His main interests include: celestial mechanics, mission design, optimal control, and evolutionary algorithms.


Panel 3: Threats to National Security

Moderator: Gregory A. Orndorff, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.

Mr. Orndorff is the Vice President of National Security Programs at Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc. (SGT). Previously, he was a member of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory’s Principle Professional Staff leading National Security Space Programs. He received a M.B.A. from Shenandoah University and a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from Pennsylvania State University. His industry experience includes work at Northrop Grumman on C4ISR systems and at Orbital Sciences Corporation on reusable space systems. Greg is a retired Air Force officer, experienced in launch systems and TT&C ground systems. Publication topics include space situational awareness, space traffic control, and distributed space architectures and he coauthored a book chapter on the history of space development during the Cold War. A member of AFCEA and AIAA’s technical committee on space systems.

Panelists

Owen Brown
Chief Technology Officer
KTSi

Dr. Brown is currently Chief Technology Officer of KTSi, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Scitor corporation. In this role he acts as the lead executive responsible for management, development, and integration of the company’s intellectual offering, enabling and enhancing customer technical objectives. He provides direct support to DARPA and the United States Air Force on a variety of complex space system programs. From 2003 to 2009 Owen was a program manager in DARPA’s Tactical Technology Office, where he led multiple small spacecraft programs, including System F6, and SPHERES. He worked for several years as a spacecraft engineer at Space Systems/Loral in Palo Alto. Owen also served as a nuclear submarine officer onboard fast attack submarines. He holds a B.S. in Engineering Science from Loyola University in Baltimore, and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Aero/Astro from Stanford University.

 

Mark LeBlanc
VP, Advanced Technologies & Defense Programs
Omitron, Inc.

Mr. LeBlanc serves as VP of Advanced Technologies & Defense Programs for Omitron Corporation. He is responsible for managing company-wide business related to Space Situation Awareness (SSA) and space control initiatives for all Department of Defense (DoD) and National space-related business lines. Mr. LeBlanc oversaw the contractor development, installation, training and operationalization of the High Accuracy Catalog (HAC) that is the current technical baseline at the Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC). He managed the contractor implementation of the orbital debris avoidance operations for the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent standup of similar operations for National and NASA Goddard customers. He is a retired Naval officer with previous assignments as a Flight Officer in E2C Hawkeyes and was one of the initial Navy cadre assigned to United States Space Command in 1986, where he served as an Orbital Analyst and a Defensive/Offensive Counter Space analyst. He also served in multiple space billets in USSPACECOM J3/J6 and at Buckley Air Force Base until he retired from the Naval Reserve in 2004 at the rank of Commander. Mr. Leblanc earned a BS degree in chemistry from Colorado State University, and subsequently a Masters degree in Acquisition Management and an MBA degree in Finance.

Aaron Rogers
Program Manager
Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory

Mr. Rogers is a subject matter expert of small satellite systems and technologies, with more than 16 years of direct experience for numerous DoD, NASA, and commercial programs. Presently, Aaron serves as a Program Manager and is a former Mission System Engineer, at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, overseeing the portfolio of the Lab’s small satellite related initiatives. Prior to joining APL, Aaron held technical and management positions with AeroAstro and Lockheed Martin Commercial Space Systems. He holds an appointment with the Space Systems Engineering program at Johns Hopkins University and is the Technical Chair of the AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites. Aaron holds a B.S. in Aeronautics & Astronautics from MIT and an M.S. in Applied Physics from The Johns Hopkins University.

 

James Armor
Vice President
ATK Spacecraft Systems & Services

Mr. Armor is the VP of ATK Spacecraft Systems & Services. He was the 2012 von Braun Award recipient, and has over 30 years of successful senior management, where has been responsible for all aspects of planning, program management, and operations in organizations ranging in size from 150 to over 25,000. His background includes 18 years directing government space systems with a recognized record of strategic vision and team building leading to mission success. He is a trained astronaut with exceptional communication, program innovation, and customer relations skills. He established a successful independent consulting firm, and is currently board director.


Panel 4: Debris Field Modeling and Simulation

Moderator: Lauri Newman, NASA Robotic Conjunction Assessment Manager
NASA GSFC Robotic Systems Protection Program / Code 590

Ms. Newman is a member of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Robotic Systems Protection Program/Code 590. Since 2005, she has managed the Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis (CARA) effort for NASA’s unmanned missions, and serves as the Agency point of contact for Space Situational Awareness (SSA) for robotic missions. Prior to 2005, Ms. Newman spent 15 years as a Flight Dynamics Engineer. She has performed trajectory design for numerous missions including the Earth Observing System missions (Terra, Aqua, and Aura); the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe; Clementine, and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. She holds Masters and Bachelor of Science degrees in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Panelists

Ivonne Rodriguez
Orbital Debris Specialist
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Ms. Rodriguez is Orbital Debris Engineer at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. She provides MMOD assessments and services to missions in development phase. In addition, she provides engineering support to Goddard's Mission Design Lab (MDL) and Instrument Design Lab (IDL) in the areas of orbital debris, end of mission planning and planetary protection. Previously, she worked as Aerospace Engineer in electromechanical systems for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS). She received her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering in 2002 and her B.S. in Physical Sciencies in 1988, both from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus.

 

John T. Emmert
Research Physicist
Naval Research Laboratory

Dr. Emmert is a research physicist in the Geospace Science and Technology Branch within the Space Science Division at the Naval Research Laboratory. Dr. Emmert’s research focuses on the climate and dynamics of the thermosphere, using a variety of extensive geophysical databases and models. He has developed a 45-year database of thermospheric densities derived from orbital tracking of 5,000 space objects in low Earth orbit. He has employed this data set for continuing studies of long-term upper atmospheric climate change, for analysis of the thermospheric response to solar activity variations, and for validation of thermospheric densities inferred from far-ultraviolet remote sensing. He has also studied extensively the effect of geospace storms on global thermospheric dynamics and has developed a global empirical model of geomagnetic storm effects on thermospheric winds. Dr. Emmert received a B.S. in astronomy from the University of Arizona and a Ph.D. in physics from Utah State University.

Liying Qian
Project Scientist
National Center for Atmospheric Research

Dr. Qian is a scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. She received her Ph.D. in atmospheric science from the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Qian studies thermosphere and ionosphere responses to space weather events including solar flares and magnetic storms, climate changes in the thermosphere and ionosphere due to anthropogenic forcing through greenhouse gases, and impact of space weather and climate on space technology.  In addition, she investigates vertical coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere. She has extensive experience in upper atmosphere numerical modeling and data analysis.

 

Surjalal Sharma
Senior Research Scientist
University of Maryland, Astronomy Dept.

Dr. Sharma is a Senior Research Scientist and Director of Goddard Planetary Heliophysics Institute in the Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park. His current interests are data-driven modeling of complex systems, space weather prediction, simulations of space plasmas and space debris. He has led many multi-disciplinary teams, including the design and planning of a tokamak experiment and a multi-spacecraft mission to the magnetosphere. Dr. Sharma serves on the editorial boards of AGU/EGU/IGU journals, edited five monographs and published more than 150 papers. He received BS and MS degrees in physics from the University of Delhi and a Ph. D. in physics from Gujarat University.


Panel 5: Current Practices and Active Research

Moderator: Roger Thompson, Senior Engineering Specialist
Mission Analysis and Operations Department, The Aerospace Corporation

Dr. Thompson is a senior engineering specialist in the Mission Analysis and Operations Department at The Aerospace Corporation. During his 16 years at Aerospace, he has provided space situational awareness and collision avoidance analyses, and real-time operations support to a number of space missions. Thompson performs orbital and trajectory modeling, orbit determination, and formation flying and proximity operations as part of his job. He also supports real-time launch and on-orbit collision risk assessments, on-orbit breakup event analysis, orbit transfer and maneuver planning, and deorbit/reentry analysis. He has experience in launch and orbital collision avoidance, uncertainty modeling, probability analysis, pointing and tracking systems, orbit and attitude dynamics, coverage analyses, optimal control systems, structural analysis and design, structural dynamics, and optimal controls. Thompson has provided collision risk analyses for actual or potential on-orbit collisions and developed software used to analyze those events. Thompson is based out of Aerospace’s Chantilly, Va., office. Dr. Thompson holds a B.S. in engineering science and mechanics from North Carolina State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in engineering mechanics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

Panelists

Scott Hull
Orbital Debris Services Group Leader
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Mr. Hull is the Orbital Debris Services Group Leader at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He has worked exclusively since 2002 on orbital debris assessment and limitation issues involving hardware design as well as operations. Prior experience includes two years supporting nearly two dozen operational Space Science missions, five years as a Parts Engineer, and seven years of failure analysis on a wide variety of applications. He received his B.S. in Materials Engineering from Drexel University in 1987. In addition to a number of papers, he recently authored the new End of Mission Considerations chapter for the "Space Mission Engineering: The New SMAD" textbook.

 

 

Andrew Higgins
Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering
McGill University, Montreal

Dr. Higgins is an associate professor of Mechanical Engineering at McGill University, Montreal. He has over 20 years of experience in shock wave experimentation, modelling, and simulation, encompassing shock and detonation waves in gas-phase, multiphase, and condensed-phase materials. His research at McGill has included using energetic materials to launch projectiles to record velocities for orbital debris impact simulation and for fundamental equation of state studies. He has a PhD (’96) and MS (’93) in Aeronautics and Astronautics form the University of Washington, Seattle, and a BS (’91) in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from the University of Illinois in Urbana/Champaign.

David Spencer
Professor of Aerospace Engineering
Pennsylvania State University

Dr. Spencer is a Professor of Aerospace Engineering at PSU. His research areas include: spacecraft dynamics and controls, trajectory optimization, space systems engineering, and theoretical and applied astrodynamics. Prior to his current position he worked at Aerospace Corp. (1985-1990) and at AFRL, Kirtland (1991-1999). He is a Fellow of the AAS, an Associate Fellow of the AIAA,  an Associate Editor for the AIAA JSR and is a member of the AIAA Astrodynamics Technical Committee. He is currently the VP, Technical for the AAS, and a member of the IAF’s Astrodynamics Committee and the Space Education and Outreach Committee. Dr. Spencer received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the U. of Kentucky, an M.S. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Purdue University, an M.B.A. from Penn State, and a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering Sciences from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

 

Dan Oltrogge
SDC Program Manager and Sr. Research Astrodynamicist, AGI

Mr. Oltrogge is a Senior Research Astrodynamicist with AGI's Center for Space Standards and Innovation and Program Manager of the Space Data Center, providing space situational awareness and analysis support to 25 government, civil and commercial space operators. Dan’s specialties include launch and early orbit operations, nanosatellites, collision avoidance, RF interference mitigation, space situational awareness, astrodynamics and international standards development for space operations and orbital debris mitigation.


Panel 6: Remediation Architectures and Technologies

Moderator: Gordon Roesler, Program Manager, DARPA Tactical Technology Office

Dr. Roesler joined DARPA in May 2014 after working as a Senior Project Engineer at the Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research at the University of South Wales. His past research interests have included space systems, robotic naval vehicles, sensor systems, and energy systems. At DARPA, he is primarily interested in developing a capability for robotic servicing of satellites. At the University of South Wales, Dr. Roesler was responsible for concept development, systems engineering, and technical coordination of a multi-organization spacecraft design program. Before that, he served as Center Director for the Information Sciences Institute at the University of Southern California (USC), where he initiated new programs in the application of computer science to energy systems. Prior to his work at USC, he worked as a Senior Physicist at the Science Applications International Corporation, where he proposed and managed a research program for a revolutionary wave-aware control system for small manned and unmanned boats. This is Dr. Roesler’s second sojourn as a PM with DARPA; previously, he originated the Spacecraft for the Universal Modification of Orbits (SUMO) and Front-End Robotics Enabling Near-term Demonstration (FREND) programs. Dr. Roesler holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from the United States Naval Academy and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is an avid sailor and glider pilot.

Panelists

Eric Sundberg
Principal Scientist
The Aerospace Corporation

Eric Sundberg is a Principal Scientist in the Aerospace Corporation providing decision support to the Executive Agent for Space Staff (EA4SS) and the Undersecretary of Defense – Intelligence – Battlespace Awareness Portfolio (USD(I).  Prior to joining Aerospace, he was an Air Force Colonel and spent over 30 years in the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO). There he served in a wide variety of capacities including Manned Spacecraft Engineer (Space Shuttle Payload Specialist), Director of the Measurements and Signatures Intelligence (MASINT) Program, Chief of Staff of the Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) Directorate, Associate Director of the Advanced Technology and Systems Directorate and in the Office of Deputy Director for Systems Engineering. Along the way he also served as the Space Command Chair at the Air University at Maxwell Air Force Base for the 1988 and 1989 academic years.

 

Jim Shoemaker
Senior Scientist
Logos Technologies

Dr. Shoemaker (LtCol USAF, ret.) is currently a Senior Scientist at Logos Technologies, where he provides technical, systems engineering, and programmatic guidance to government and commercial clients. Prior retiring from the Air Force, he served as a Program Manager in the Tactical Technology Office at DARPA, where he led the Orbital Express satellite servicing program, the Streak satellite technology demonstration, and the Space Surveillance telescope. Prior to DARPA, at the Missile Defense Agency, he led lead the STRV-2 technology demonstration mission and delivered payloads to the STRV-1C/D, both missions in partnership with the United Kingdom defense space research agency. He holds a doctorate in physics and MS in nuclear physics from the Air Force Institute of Technology.

Dennis Wingo
CEO and Founder
Skycorp, Inc.

Dennis Wingo is a 36 year veteran of academia, as well as the computer, aerospace, and defense industries.  Dennis has two patents related to the on orbit assembly and servicing of spacecraft.  Dennis has authored numerous papers on space related subjects, as well as a book “Moonrush” on the principles and purpose behind lunar industrialization.  Dennis was a co-author for Volume II of the National Defense University’s “Toward a Theory of Space Power”, published in 2012.  Dennis is the CEO of Skycorp Incorporated where he continues to push the boundaries of design in spacecraft systems.

 

Brook Sullivan
Senior Consultant
Space Systems Integration, LLC

Dr. Sullivan is a senior consultant for Space Systems Integration, LLC. He is currently providing technical support to the DARPA space robotics program. He has 25 years of experience in space systems engineering. He holds a bachelor’s degree from MIT and a doctorate from the University of Maryland. His 2005 dissertation is titled “Technical and Economic Feasibility of Telerobotic On-Orbit Satellite Servicing.” His professional roles have included systems engineer for Space Station assembly; lead engineer for end-effectors and mission planning for the Ranger Telerobotic Shuttle Experiment; neutral-buoyancy robotics-research diver; and systems engineer and launch campaign coordinator for STPsat-1. In 2010 he collaborated with Dr. Wade Pulliam on the DARPA Catcher’s Mitt orbital debris removal study.


Panel 7: Entrepreneurial Opportunities

Moderator: Charles Miller, NexGen Space LLC

Mr. Miller is President and owner of NexGen Space LLC, which provides consulting services to governments, traditional aerospace firms, and entrepreneurial companies at the intersection of civil space, commercial space, and public policy. He is also a member of the Horizon Strategies Group. Miller is the Co-Founder of Nanoracks LLC, which has delivered nearly 200 payloads to date to the International Space Station (ISS). Nanoracks provides internal ISS microgravity research services, ISS external platform services, and small satellite launch services. He served as NASA Senior Advisor for Commercial Space in Washington, DC from February 2009 to January 2012, and was CEO and President of Constellation Services International, Inc. (CSI) from 1998 to February 2009. Miller proposed "New Space" as national branding and marketing theme in July 2004, while serving as a member of the Board of Directors of the Space Frontier Foundation. NewSpace has been widely adopted across the space industry to distinguish between differing space policy and business practices.

Panelists

Jerome Pearson
President
STAR, Inc.

Mr. Pearson is President of STAR, Inc. He started as an aerospace engineer for NASA Langley and Ames during the Apollo Program, and received the NASA Apollo Achievement Award in 1969. He joined AFRL in 1971, and developed vibration control for high-power lasers and a kinetic-kill vehicle concept for SDI in the 1980’s. As Chief of the AFRL Structural Dynamics Branch, he helped develop the high-temperature acoustics test facility at Wright-Patterson AFB in Ohio, which was used for AMRAAM testing and NASP development.  Mr. Pearson has degrees in engineering and geology, and is the author of nearly 100 technical articles, including invited articles for Encyclopedia Britannica and New Scientist. He is a Fellow of the British Interplanetary Society, an Associate Fellow of the AIAA, and member of the AIAA Space Colonization Technical Committee. In 2002 was elected Member of the International Academy of Astronautics, sponsored by Sir Arthur Clarke, and is active in the IAA Commission 3 with proposals for removal of space debris.

 

Rob Quigley
Systems Engineer
ATK Spacecraft Systems Division

Mr. Quigley is a member of the Advanced Systems Group within ATK’s Space System Division and has over 10 years of experience in the aerospace industry. He currently leads and manages the division’s IR&D (Independent Research and Development) activities, which include major research focus areas in Space Logistics and Space Mission Architecture. He also leverages his aerospace engineering and MBA degrees to provide business case and strategy development for the Space Mission Systems business lane. Mr. Quigley has been heavily involved with evaluation and strategy formation for the division’s commercial satellite mission / NewSpace opportunities since 2010. He is part of the team that developed and formed ViviSat, ATK’s satellite servicing joint venture, and continues to support its start-up activities.

Robert P. Hoyt
CEO and Chief Scientist
Tethers Unlimited, Inc.

Dr. Robert P. Hoyt is the CEO and Chief Scientist of Tethers Unlimited, Inc. He is a physicist and engineer, known for his invention of the Hoytether. He also originated the MXER Tether concept, which combines momentum-exchange techniques with electrodynamic reboost propulsion to enable a bolo tether system to serve as a fully reusable in-space upper stage for boosting many payloads from LEO to GEO or lunar trajectories. In addition to his work on space tethers, Dr. Hoyt has pioneered methods for using additive manufacturing to create structures and components for spacecraft, both on the ground and in orbit, and has worked to develop self-fabricating satellites under funding from DARPA and NASA. Other projects he has been involved with are an invention to drain the Van Allen radiation belts and development of robotic arms for small spacecraft.

 

 

Hoyt Davidson
Founder and Managing Member
Near Earth, LLC

Mr. Davidson is the Founder and Managing Member of Near Earth LLC. Previously, he was a Managing Director in the Telecomm Group at Credit Suisse First Boston. Mr. Davidson’s investment banking career began in 1987 as an associate and one of only approximately 100 bankers at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette. He was part of the phenomenal growth and success of DLJ to over 1,000 bankers by the time of its acquisition by CSFB in 2000. Prior to investment banking, Hoyt Davidson was a Senior Research Engineer in the Space Systems Division of Lockheed Missiles and Space Company before leaving to get his MBA at MIT’s Sloan School. Mr. Davidson also earned his undergraduate degree in Physics from MIT.


Panel 8: Orbital Debris Research Priorities

Moderator: Raymond Sedwick, CODER Director, University of Maryland

Dr. Sedwick is an Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering, Director of Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research at the University of Maryland where he has been since Fall of 2007. He is also recognized as a Keystone Professor within the A. James Clark School of Engineering and is the Director of the Aerospace Engineering Honors Program. Dr. Sedwick’s current research includes orbital debris remediation, RF plasma generation for space propulsion, plasma assisted combustion and catalyzed decomposition, ion plume material impact damage, and novel fusion confinement for space and terrestrial power applications. Dr. Sedwick was the inaugural recipient of the Bepi Colombo Prize, as well as the recipient of an NSF CAREER award on the development of compact helicon sources. He is an Associate Fellow of the AIAA, an Associate Editor of the AIAA Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, and serves on the AIAA Nuclear and Future Flight Technical Committee. Dr. Sedwick received a BS in Aerospace Engineering from Penn State University in 1992, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 1994 and 1997.

Panelists

Scott Hull
Orbital Debris Services Group Leader
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Mr. Hull is the Orbital Debris Services Group Leader at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He has worked exclusively since 2002 on orbital debris assessment and limitation issues involving hardware design as well as operations. Prior experience includes two years supporting nearly two dozen operational Space Science missions, five years as a Parts Engineer, and seven years of failure analysis on a wide variety of applications. He received his B.S. in Materials Engineering from Drexel University in 1987. In addition to a number of papers, he recently authored the new End of Mission Considerations chapter for the "Space Mission Engineering: The New SMAD" textbook.

 

Roger Thompson
Senior Engineering Specialist
Mission Analysis and Operations Department
The Aerospace Corporation

Dr. Thompson is a senior engineering specialist in the Mission Analysis and Operations Department at The Aerospace Corporation. During his 16 years at Aerospace, he has provided space situational awareness and collision avoidance analyses, and real-time operations support to a number of space missions. Thompson performs orbital and trajectory modeling, orbit determination, and formation flying and proximity operations as part of his job. He also supports real-time launch and on-orbit collision risk assessments, on-orbit breakup event analysis, orbit transfer and maneuver planning, and deorbit/reentry analysis. Thompson has provided collision risk analyses for actual or potential on-orbit collisions and developed software used to analyze those events. Dr. Thompson holds a B.S. in engineering science and mechanics from NC State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in engineering mechanics from VPI.

Wade Pulliam
Logos Technologies

Dr. Pulliam is currently Manager of Advanced Concepts at Logos Technologies where he is developing innovative platforms, including UAVs and ground vehicles. Previous he served as a Program Manager in the Tactical Technology Office at DARPA, where he developed innovative platform programs as well as the Catcher's Mitt Study, an examination of the orbital debris issue and potential remediation approaches. Dr. Pulliam has also served in the FCS Technology Office and HSAPRA. He holds a doctorate in aerospace engineering from Virginia Tech, an MA in National Security Studies from Georgetown and is an Associate Fellow of AIAA.

 

David Spencer
Professor of Aerospace Engineering
Pennsylvania State University

Dr.  Spencer is a Professor of Aerospace Engineering at PSU. His research areas include: spacecraft dynamics and controls, trajectory optimization, space systems engineering, and theoretical and applied astrodynamics. Prior to his current position he worked at Aerospace Corp. (1985-1990) and at AFRL, Kirtland (1991-1999). He is a Fellow of the AAS, an Associate Fellow of the AIAA,  an Associate Editor for the AIAA JSR and is a member of the AIAA Astrodynamics Technical Committee. He is currently the VP, Technical for the AAS, and a member of the IAF’s Astrodynamics Committee and the Space Education and Outreach Committee. Dr. Spencer received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the U. of Kentucky, an M.S. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Purdue University, an M.B.A. from Penn State, and a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering Sciences from the University of Colorado at Boulder.