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DoD’s oldest weather satellite explodes, debris field still expanding

DoD’s oldest weather satellite explodes, debris field still expanding


Even though sound is impossible in a vacuum, it’s basically impossible to keep an explosion quiet in space. This week, news broke that in early February a satellite in the US Department of Defense’s longest running weather satellite had exploded in orbit. The government is blaming a “temperature spike,” which is about as helpful as saying a person died because of “lethal trauma.” The military is being characteristically tight-lipped about the disaster, but despite the wish to keep a low profile, public safety meant it had to acknowledge the explosion publicly. The explosion itself had a limited impact, but now there’s a potentially bigger problem: dozens of pieces of satellite shrapnel now headed outward in all directions.

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March 12, 2015


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