Clark School
This Site umd.edu

News Story

Mock Satellite Destroyed to Study Space Junk Collisions

Mock Satellite Destroyed to Study Space Junk Collisions

Doomed for destruction is DebriSat, a nonfunctional, full-scale representation of a modern satellite, shown here prior to test at the Range G target tank at the Arnold Engineering Development Complex in Tennessee.
Doomed for destruction is DebriSat, a nonfunctional, full-scale representation of a modern satellite, shown here prior to test at the Range G target tank at the Arnold Engineering Development Complex in Tennessee.

Talk about a "bang up" job.

A full-scale lookalike of a modern satellite was destroyed in a ground test chamber recently to help scientists better grasp the effects of space collisions.

For instance, the 2009 collision between the U.S. Iridium 33 and the derelict Russian Cosmos 2251 spacecraft spotlighted the difference between breakup fragments from the newer Iridium compared with the older Russian Cosmos satellite. [7 Wild Ways to Clean Up Space Junk]

On one hand, the Department of Defense (DOD) and NASA's satellite breakup models described the fragments from the older Cosmos satellite well. But there were noticeable discrepancies in the breakup forecast of the Iridium 33.

Read more ...

October 28, 2014


Prev   Next

Current Headlines

University of Maryland Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research Announces Keynotes & Event Sponsor OrionAST

UMD Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research Announces 2016 Workshop and Call for Papers

The People in Your Neighborhood:  Dr. Moriba Jah, Space Garbage Man

Junkins presents Theodore von Karman Lecture

Bits and Pieces Of DMSP-13 No Threat To ESA Mission

DoD’s oldest weather satellite explodes, debris field still expanding

Fireballs spotted over western US as Chinese rocket burns up

Earth Pelted by More than 600 Large Debris Items in 2014, NASA Reports

News Resources

Return to Newsroom

Search News

Archived News

Events Resources

Events Calendar

Additional Resources

UM Newsdesk

Faculty Experts