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Space Junk From Failed Russian Launch Found in China

Space Junk From Failed Russian Launch Found in China

Screen capture from the live video of the Proton-M rocket launching from Baikonur space center in Kazakhstan on Friday.  Roscosmos
Screen capture from the live video of the Proton-M rocket launching from Baikonur space center in Kazakhstan on Friday.  Roscosmos

The old adage “what goes up must come down” isn’t always true for space launches — usually we like to keep things “up” for an indefinite amount of time. But after a failed rocket launch, space hardware usually has a premature trip back to Earth, sometimes surviving fiery reentry.  On Friday, a Russian Proton-M rocket carrying a communications satellite failed only minutes after launch, yet another failure in a troubling trend for the nation’s space launch capabilities. On Sunday, Chinese media reported the recovery of space junk that has now been identified as pieces from that failed Proton rocket.

See more at: Main Story

May 23, 2014


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