Clark School
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CODER2018 Sessions

MODERATORS & SPEAKERS


Session 1: Space Situational Awareness, Commercial Enterprise

Moderator: Ryan Frederic, Managing Partner, Humble Rogue Ventures

Mr. Frederic is the former President and Co-Founder of Applied Defense Solutions, Inc (ADS), a small engineering services firm focused on Space, Cyber and Geospatial Intelligence solutions in the aerospace, defense and intelligence communities. Under Ryan’s leadership, ADS has grown consistently and significantly, branching out into adjacent new markets, building a team of seasoned professionals able to tackle some of the nation’s most challenging technical problems. Ryan is a member of the American Astronautical Society, and has been a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics for 25 years.

 

 

Panel Members

Alan DeClerck
VP, Business Develop and Strategy
LeoLabs

Alan DeClerck joined LeoLabs in 2016 as Vice President, Business Development and Strategy. In addition to growing the company’s customer base, Alan is tasked marketing and strategic partnerships for LeoLabs across the new space industry. Alan brings enterprise as well as startup experience to the LeoLabs mission, and a background in evangelizing and commercializing disruptive technologies in areas outside national jurisdiction. For nearly two decades at Sun Microsystems, he held numerous positions in sales, corporate development, business strategy and partner marketing. He led business development and marketing at FirstPerson, Sun's Java startup in Palo Alto, CA in 1992, and drove key Asian and European partnerships as Director in Sun's corporate development organization. He was subsequently appointed head of Sun’s international alliances organization, based out of Geneva, where he was responsible for partner sales activities across EMEA, Asia Pacific and Latin America. His other roles at Sun included Global Executive for the Sun/Oracle Business Unit. Alan has since contributed to multiple successful IPO's and startups. Between1998 and 2000, he held executive positions in two early stage companies, as Vice President and General Manager of Beyond.com, and Vice President of Worldwide Field Operations for Skystream Networks. Alan also served as Executive Director, Ventures & Licensing at SRI International, and more recently, responsible for Data Services and Sales at Liquid Robotics. DeClerck holds a Master of Philosophy degree in International Relations from Oxford University, where he specialized in international law of the seas and strategic studies. He also earned an M.B.A. from Stanford University, and a bachelor's degree from Brown University in International Relations.

 

 

Doug Hendrix
CEO
ExoAnalytic Solutions

Dr. Doug Hendrix is chief executive officer and co-founder of ExoAnalytic Solutions, Inc. In addition to his executive role, he serves as the Commercial Space sector president. For 25 years, Dr. Hendrix has developed advanced software solutions to enable the United States to maintain its technological superiority in EO/IR sensing for missile defense and space situational awareness. Dr. Hendrix has a broad professional background that ranges from research and development to commercial software development in the areas of atmospheric, underwater and nuclear explosions, hyper-velocity impacts, space weather, and the development of a commercial fusion reactor.  As a co-founder of ExoAnalytic Solutions, he had one major idea in mind for the company, which is to build a focused team comprised of the best and brightest in the industry to develop and field cutting edge technology to greatly surpass the state of the art. In his current role at ExoAnalytic Solutions, he remains deeply involved in technology development for both missile defense and space situational awareness.  Dr. Hendrix earned a B.A. in Physics from the University of California, Berkeley and obtained his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Irvine, and is the proud son of a former submarine officer.

Robert MacMillan
Vice President and General Manager
L3 Applied Defense Solutions

Robert MacMillan is the former CEO/COO of Applied Defense Solutions, a small engineering services firm dedicated to expanding access to, furthering exploration of, and ensuring the protection of space for DoD, IC, civil, commercial, and international customers and their missions. After L3 Technologies acquired ADS in June 2018, Mr. MacMillan assumed the role of Vice President and General Manager for L3 Applied Defense Solutions. He has more than 20 years experience providing innovative solutions and services to the nation's most difficult National Security Space challenges in space situational awareness, space battle management command & control (BMC2), and space protection and resiliency. Robert is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Air Force Academy earning a Bachelor's degree in Physics and a graduate of The Ohio State University earning a Master's degree in Physics. Robert has real-world experience leading agile software engineering projects, a proven-track record in project management, and strong leadership credentials spanning his career. He is a certified Project Management Professional with experience both as a United States Air Force officer, a Government contractor, and an experienced corporate executive. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Project Management Institute.


Session 2: Space Situational Awareness, Tracking and Identification

Moderator: Ray Sedwick, Director, Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research

Ray Sedwick is an Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering, Director of Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research at the University of Maryland where he has been since Fall of 2007. He is also recognized as a Keystone Professor within the A. James Clark School of Engineering and is the Director of the Aerospace Engineering Honors Program. Dr. Sedwick’s current research includes orbital debris remediation, RF plasma generation for space propulsion, plasma assisted combustion and catalyzed decomposition, ion plume material impact damage, and novel fusion confinement for space and terrestrial power applications. Dr. Sedwick was the inaugural recipient of the Bepi Colombo Prize, as well as the recipient of an NSF CAREER award on the development of compact helicon sources. He is an Associate Fellow of the AIAA, an Associate Editor of the AIAA Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, and serves on the AIAA Nuclear and Future Flight Technical Committee. Dr. Sedwick received a BS in Aerospace Engineering from Penn State University and M.S / Ph.D. from the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

Presenters

Andrew Abraham
Senior Member of the Technical Staff
Aerospace Corporation

Dr. Andrew Abraham is a senior member of the technical staff at The Aerospace Corporation. He has worked on a variety of U.S. government programs, specializing in orbital debris, early orbit operations, conjunction assessment, maneuver planning, and reentry analysis. He has an M.S. in physics and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering. His dissertation concentrated on the optimization of spacecraft maneuvers in the restricted three-body problem. Prior to joining Aerospace, he interned at NASA Glenn Research Center and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

 

 

James Wertz
President
Microcosm

Dr. Wertz is one of the originators of the push for Responsive Space in order to dramatically reduce space mission cost and schedule, and was the general chairman of the Responsive Space Conference for 10 years.  Dr. Wertz is the editor and a principal author of 5 widely used books in space technology with over 100,000 copies in print:  Space Mission Analysis and Design (SMAD), Space Mission Engineering, Reducing Space Mission Cost, Orbit and Constellation Design and Management, and Spacecraft Attitude Determination and Control.  He is an Adjunct Prof. of Astronautics at USC, a Fellow of the AIAA and the British Interplanetary Society, and a member of the International Academy of Astronautics.  He teaches courses worldwide in both “Space Mission Engineering,” and “Reducing Space Mission Cost."

Christine Hartzell
Assistant Professor, Aerospace Engineering
University of Maryland

Christine Hartzell received her Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering Sciences from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 2012. Her thesis topic was electrostatic dust motion near the surface of asteroids and the Moon. After completing her Ph.D., she was a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Keck Institute for Space Studies at the California Institute of Technology, where she studied granular media. She received her B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2008. Her research focuses on dust motion on airless bodies for the purpose of understanding the evolution of these bodies and improving the design of spacecraft to explore them.

 

Arthur Lue
Technical Staff
MIT Lincoln Laboratory

Dr. Arthur Lue received his PhD in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1997. He has published 20 articles in theoretical particle physics, gravitational physics and cosmology with over 1700 citations, including an invited review article in Physics Reports on understanding dark energy as modified gravity. Since 2006, he has been technical staff at MIT Lincoln Laboratory focusing on the physics of orbital dynamics, applied to a wide range of space control issues, including being the astrodynamics lead on the Space Fence government reference design team, and the teams developing the Space Surveillance Telescope and ORS-5.


Session 3: Space Traffic Management

Moderator: David Spencer, Professor, Aerospace Engineering, Pennsylvania State University

David Spencer joined Penn State in 1999. He is the faculty adviser for the Astrodynamics Research Group of Penn State and LionTech Rocket Labs. He is an American Astronautical Society (AAS) Fellow, an American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Associate Fellow, and an International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) Corresponding Member. He is vice president of publications for AAS; a member of AIAA’s Astrodynamics Technical Committee and Public Policy Committee; a member of IAF’s Space Education and Outreach Committee; and a member of IAA’s Committee on Space Debris and Commission 3: Space Technology and System Development. Since joining Penn State, Spencer has been honored for his teaching and service with a 2008 AIAA Sustained Service Award, a 2006 SAE International Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award, and a 2004 Penn State Engineering Alumni Society Outstanding Teaching Award. Spencer has been named the recipient of the 2018 International Astronautical Federation (IAF) Frank J. Malina Astronautics Medal, presented annually to an educator who has demonstrated excellence in taking the fullest advantage of the resources available to them to promote the study of astronautics and related space sciences.

Presenters

Marshall Kaplan
Associate Director
Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research

Dr. Marshall Kaplan is a Professor of the Practice in Aerospace Engineering and Associate Director of CODER. He is an expert in space flight technologies, orbital mechanics and space debris issues. In fact, he was the first to study space junk retrieval and was instrumental in the safe reentry of the Skylab Space Station in 1979. He has over four decades of academic and industrial experience, having served as Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University and presented hundreds of courses on space technology and systems. In addition to publishing over 100 papers, reports and articles on aerospace technologies, he is the author of several books, including the internationally used text, Modern Spacecraft Dynamics and Control. Dr. Kaplan is a Fellow of the AIAA and a member of the AIAA Technical Committee on Space Transportation. He holds advanced degrees from MIT and Stanford University.

 

Joshua Sloane
Flight Test Mission Planning Analyst
Johns Hopkins University APL
PhD Candidate
University of Maryland, Aerospace Engineering

Joshua Sloane is a mission planning analyst in the Air and Missile Defense Test and Evaluation Group (A1G) at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Josh has supported multiple aspects of mission planning including range safety analysis, satellite collision avoidance, intercept debris modeling, and best-estimated-trajectory generation. Josh is also a doctoral candidate at the University of Maryland Space Power and Propulsion Laboratory. His research interests focus on laser ablation, with applications for time-of-flight mass spectrometry, space propulsion, asteroid mitigation, and orbital debris remediation.

Nathan Reiland
Graduate Research Assistant
University of Arizona

Mr. Reiland is graduate student at the University of Arizona pursuing a Master's degree in Aerospace Engineering with an emphasis on astrodynamics and control systems. He also holds a Bachelor's degree in Aerospace engineering from the same institution. Additionally, Mr. Reiland is a researcher at the University of Arizona Spaceflight, Applied Mechanics and Orbital Systems (SAMOS) lab, working under the direction of Dr. Aaron J. Rosengren. His research is focused on orbit determination and close approach prediction. Following the completion of his Master's degree, he intends to pursue a PhD in Astrodynamics.

 


Session 4: Atmospheric Modeling and Re-entry

Moderator: Marshall Kaplan, Associate Director, Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research

Dr. Marshall Kaplan is a Professor of the Practice in Aerospace Engineering and Associate Director of CODER. He is an expert in space flight technologies, orbital mechanics and space debris issues. In fact, he was the first to study space junk retrieval and was instrumental in the safe reentry of the Skylab Space Station in 1979. He has over four decades of academic and industrial experience, having served as Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University and presented hundreds of courses on space technology and systems. In addition to publishing over 100 papers, reports and articles on aerospace technologies, he is the author of several books, including the internationally used text, Modern Spacecraft Dynamics and Control. Dr. Kaplan is a Fellow of the AIAA and a member of the AIAA Technical Committee on Space Transportation. He holds advanced degrees from MIT and Stanford University.

Presenters

Eric Eiler
Technical Staff Member
Aerospace Corporation

Mr. Eric Eiler is a Member of the Technical Staff within the Mission Analysis and Operations Department (MAOD) in the Systems Engineering Division (SED) at The Aerospace Corporation in Chantilly, VA. The department is focused on space situational awareness analysis and real-time operations support, including launch and on-orbit collision risk assessments, on-orbit breakup event analysis, orbit transfer and maneuver planning, and deorbit/reentry analysis. He primarily contributes to orbital debris analysis, reentry studies, and launch collision avoidance activities. Other technical contributions include orbit analysis, modeling and simulation, and performance analysis. Mr. Eiler obtained an M.S., and B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

 

Martin Ratliff
Principal Space Environments Specialist
JPL, California Institute of Technology

Martin Ratliff’s expertise lies in space environment definition and risk mitigation, and in navigating the compliance process for orbital-debris-limitation requirements that are imposed on flight projects. Typical environments of concern for flight projects are debris and meteoroid environments, and high-energy charged-particle radiation (both cumulative exposure, and near-term space weather effects on critical events). For over 25 years he has been a member of the Space Environments Group in the Office of Safety and Mission Success at JPL. He has Ph.D. in physics from Rice University.

Dan Brandt
Doctoral Candidate
University of Michigan

Daniel A. Brandt received his B.A. in Physics from Case Western Reserve University, where he split his time performing experiments on cosmic ray detection hardware with the CWRU High Energy Astrophysics Group led by Dr. Corbin Covault and studying galaxy-quasar spectra under Dr. Jason X. Prochaska at the UC, Santa Cruz. Since then, he has spent a summer at Harris Corporation performing trade studies on the usage of different spectral bands for a CubeSat-borne Fourier Transform Spectrometer, and at the University of Michigan – Ann Arbor he is a doctoral student under Dr. Aaron Ridley, where he studies the influence of magnetospheric energy input into the thermosphere on the trajectory of LEO satellites, particularly CubeSats. 

 

Session 5: Wrap Up Roundtable: Moving Forward on Debris Mitigation and SSA/STM

Moderator: Theresa Hitchens, Senior Research Associate, CISSM

Theresa Hitchens is a Senior Research Scholar at the Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM). She focuses on space security, cyber security, and governance issues surrounding disruptive technologies. Prior to joining CISSM, Hitchens was the director of the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) in Geneva from 2009 through 2014. Among her activities and accomplishments at UNIDIR, Hitchens served as a consultant to the U.N. Group of Governmental Experts on Transparency and Confidence Building Measures in Outer Space Activities, provided expert advice to the Conference on Disarmament regarding the prevention of an arms race in outer space (PAROS), and launched UNIDIR's annual conference on cyber security. Hitchens served as Director at the Center for Defense Information, and was also previously Research Director of the Washington affiliate of the British American Security Information Council (BASIC), where she managed the organization’s program of research and advocacy in nuclear and conventional arms control, European security and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) affairs.

Panelists

Diane Howard
Assist.Professor of Commercial Space Operations
Embry Riddle University

Professor Dr. Diane Howard is Assistant Professor in the Commercial Space Operations program at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Diane first became involved in space initiatives in 2004, participating in citizen lobbying efforts to facilitate the passing of the Commercial Space Law Amendments Act of 2004. After working as a staff attorney in the Florida Appellate courts for a number of years, she took the decision to specialize in space law and attended McGill University’s Institute of Air and Space Law. Diane serves as Executive Secretary of the International Institute of Space Law and participates in numerous legal projects, both domestically and internationally. She works with COMSTAC Working Groups when invited. The US Department of State named her a private sector advisor and subject matter expert in Expert Group D of the UN COPUOS STSC Long Term Sustainability of Space Activities Working Group. Dr. Howard was legal lead for the International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety Suborbital Safety (IAASS) Technical Committee. She continues to publish her research and speaks at space conferences and events throughout the world. In addition to the IISL and the IAASS, Diane is a member of the AIAA and the Florida Bar.

 

Victoria Samson
Washington Office Director
Secure World Foundation

Ms. Victoria Samson is the Washington Office Director of the Secure World Foundation. Before joining SWF, Ms. Samson served as a Senior Analyst for the Center for Defense Information (CDI), where she leveraged her expertise in missile defense, nuclear reductions, and space security issues to conduct in-depth analysis and media commentary. Prior to her time at CDI, Ms. Samson was the Senior Policy Associate at the Coalition to Reduce Nuclear Dangers, a consortium of arms control groups in the Washington, D.C. area, where she worked with Congressional staffers, members of the media, embassy officials, citizens, and think-tanks on issues surrounding dealing with national missile defense and nuclear weapons reductions. Before that, she was a researcher at Riverside Research Institute, where she worked on war-gaming scenarios for the Missile Defense Agency's Directorate of Intelligence. Ms. Samson holds a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in political science with a specialization in international relations from UCLA and a Master of Arts (M.A.) in international relations from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

Josef. F. Koller
Systems Director
Aerospace Corporation

Dr. Josef Koller is a Systems Director for the Center for Space Policy and Strategy, serving as a senior analyst and team leader on topics that cut across policy, technology, and economics. Prior to joining Aerospace, Dr. Koller served as a Senior Advisor to the Office of the Secretary of Defense for Space Policy where he directly supported key national and international strategy efforts for space-related U.S. Government and DoD policy matters including commercial remote sensing, space traffic management, and related congressional affairs. Prior to that assignment, Dr. Koller managed and co-lead over 40 scientists in the “Space Science and Applications Group” at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dr. Koller also established and led the Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School to promote graduate student research and outreach at the Laboratory. Dr. Koller has over 17 years of experience with global security and space science programs. He has authored over 50 peer-reviewed scientific publications with 700+ citations. Dr. Koller has a Ph.D. in Astrophysics from Rice University.

 

Therese Jones
Senior Director of Policy
Satellite Industry Association

Therese Jones joined the Satellite Industry Association as its Senior Director of Policy in January 2018. In this role, Ms. Jones supports SIA’s work on government services, regulatory, legislative, defense, export-control and trade issues of critical importance to the Association’s members. Prior to joining SIA, Ms. Jones was an assistant policy researcher at the RAND Corporation, where she focused on space policy. In this role, she supported the Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, U.S. Air Force, and Army in assessing new space technologies, increasing the resilience of the national space architecture, and determining commercial acquisition strategies for communications and remote sensing services. Her research portfolio also includes several cyber security projects on the impact of cyber incidents to the global economy. Before transitioning into space policy, she worked as an astrophysics researcher focusing on galaxy formation and evolution. Ms. Jones is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Policy Analysis at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. She holds a master’s in astrophysics from the University of California, Berkeley, and bachelor’s degrees in astronomy and astrophysics, physics, German, and international studies from The Pennsylvania State University

 

 


Session 6: Debris Mitigation Technologies

Moderator: Roger Thompson, Senior Engineering Specialist, The Aerospace Corporation

Dr. Roger Thompson is a senior engineering specialist in the Mission Analysis and Operations Department at The Aerospace Corporation. During his 16 years at Aerospace, he has provided space situational awareness and collision avoidance analyses, and real-time operations support to a number of space missions. Thompson performs orbital and trajectory modeling, orbit determination, and formation flying and proximity operations as part of his job. He also supports real-time launch and on-orbit collision risk assessments, on-orbit breakup event analysis, orbit transfer and maneuver planning, and deorbit/reentry analysis. Thompson has provided collision risk analyses for actual or potential on-orbit collisions and developed software used to analyze those events. Dr. Thompson holds a B.S. in engineering science and mechanics from NC State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in engineering mechanics from VPI.

Presenters

William Schonberg
Professor, Civil Engineering Department
Missouri University of Science & Technology

Dr. Schonberg has over 30 years teaching and research experience in the areas of shock physics, spacecraft protection, hypervelocity impact, and penetration mechanics. He received his BSCE from Princeton University in 1981, and his MS and PhD degrees from Northwestern University in 1983 and 1986, respectively. The results of his research have been applied to a wide variety of engineering problems, including the development of orbital debris protection systems for spacecraft in low earth orbit, kinetic energy weapons, collapse of buildings under explosive loads, insensitive munitions, and aging aircraft. A significant part of Dr. Schonberg's research is dedicated to improving the safety of long-duration spacecraft and of personnel involved in space flight and operations.  In 1998, Dr. Schonberg was promoted to Associate Fellow in the AIAA and in 2003 and 2005 he was promoted to the member rank of Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, respectively. In 2015 Dr. Schonberg was recognized by the Hypervelocity Impact Society with its Distinguished Scientist Award in recognition of his many scholarly accomplishments as well as his dedication to the Society, its programs, and its student members.

Samuel Diserens
PhD Candidate
University of Southampton

Samuel Diserens is currently a PhD student within the Astronautics research group at the University of Southampton working to investigate and develop the next generation of space debris models. This work includes a particular focus on assessing the suitability of current debris models for use in modern areas of study, such as the application of Active Debris Removal (ADR) and the interaction of satellite mega-constellations with the debris environment.

 

Hossein Namazyfard
Graduate Research Assistant
University of Arizona

Mr. Namazyfard is a second-year graduate student at the University of Arizona pursuing a Master's degree in Aerospace Engineering with an emphasis on astrodynamics and fluid mechanics. He holds a Bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering from the same institution. Mr. Namazyfard's previous research was in airfoil optimization in open-air water tunnels. He is currently a researcher at the University of Arizona Spaceflight, Applied Mechanics, and Orbital Systems (SAMOS) laboratory. His current research focus is on orbit design and lifetime predictions under the direction of Dr. Aaron J. Rosengren.


Session 7: Orbital Debris Remediation Systems and Technologies

Moderator: David Barnhart, Director, Space Technology and Systems Group

David Barnhart leads ISI’s Space Systems and Technology group, which combines disruptive research with a hands-on, small-satellite design and launch for USC Viterbi students. Barnhart’s specialties include second-generation space morphology design, robotics applied to and with satellites, and application-based engineering capabilities. He works with space experts both on USC’s main campus, via the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC), and with government and commercial space entities. A SERC founder and current director, he previously developed new aerospace and satellite systems and technologies, design tools that dramatically reduce project time-to-completion, and contact dynamic surface platens for full-size space simulation solutions.  Barnhart recently returned to ISI from DARPA, where he was a senior space project manager. Before USC he helped found and lead two space companies, Millennium Space Systems and Germany-based Vanguard Space. Barnhart earned his BSAE from Boston University and his master’s degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute, both in aerospace engineering. Including his previous tenure, he has been with ISI for 7 years.

Presenters

Marshall Kaplan
Chief Technology Officer
Launchspace Technologies Corporation

Dr. Marhshall Kaplan is a Professor of the Practice in Aerospace Engineering and Associate Director of CODER. He is an expert in space flight technologies, orbital mechanics and space debris issues. In fact, he was the first to study space junk retrieval and was instrumental in the safe reentry of the Skylab Space Station in 1979. He has over four decades of academic and industrial experience, having served as Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University and presented hundreds of courses on space technology and systems. In addition to publishing over 100 papers, reports and articles on aerospace technologies, he is the author of several books, including the internationally used text, Modern Spacecraft Dynamics and Control. Dr. Kaplan is a Fellow of the AIAA and a member of the AIAA Technical Committee on Space Transportation. He holds advanced degrees from MIT and Stanford University.

 

Charity Weeden
US Managing Representative
Astroscale

Charity is the US Managing Representative for Astroscale, the first private company with a mission to secure long-term spaceflight safety by developing space debris removal services. Previously, she held the position of Senior Director of Policy at the Satellite Industry Association (SIA). Prior to SIA, Charity served as the Canadian Embassy Assistant Attaché for Air and Space Operations and is a 23-year veteran of the RCAF. Other followed assignments included: Deputy Sensor Manager for the U.S. Space Surveillance Network at U.S. Air Force Space Command, policy officer at NORAD and USNORTHCOM, and Flight Support Operations Manager at the Canadian Space Agency.  Charity attended Royal Military College of Canada (BEng, Mechanical), the University of North Dakota (MSc, Space Studies), International Space University (Certificate Summer Session), and Brookings Executive Education (Certificate Policy Strategy).

Jan Anike Nikolajsen
PhD Fellow
Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University

Mr. Jan Ánike Nikolajsen is currently a Ph.D. student within the Materials and Structural Testing research group at Aalborg University Esbjerg working on Self-deployable Space Structures. Working on a prototype for the TeSeR project where the main focus in on folding the highly flexible frame for the drag sail. This reaches include material and model testing for the highly flexible frame, assembly and testing of the Self-deployable Space Structures.

 

James Thorne
Instructor, Launch Space Services
Lt. Colonel, USAF (Ret.)

Dr. James D. Thorne retired from the US Air Force, following a career in space technology, acquisition and policy.  He has since conducted analyses of space-related program concepts for various government agencies, and also does independent research in the field of orbital mechanics. Jim published a time-explicit power series solution to a classical orbit determination problem, known in the literature as “Thorne’s solution of the Lambert problem” and has also published basic research in continuous-thrust trajectory optimization.  He holds a BS from Purdue University and MS & PhD degrees from the AF Institute of Technology, all in Astronautical Engineering. Jim is a member of the American Astronautical Society and is a frequent reviewer of technical journal articles in the field of astrodynamics.