Clark School
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CODER2016 Sessions

MODERATORS & PANELISTS


Session 1a: Space Situational Awareness

Moderator: Ray Sedwick, Director, Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research

Ray Sedwick is an Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering, Director of Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research at the University of Maryland where he has been since Fall of 2007. He is also recognized as a Keystone Professor within the A. James Clark School of Engineering and is the Director of the Aerospace Engineering Honors Program. Dr. Sedwick’s current research includes orbital debris remediation, RF plasma generation for space propulsion, plasma assisted combustion and catalyzed decomposition, ion plume material impact damage, and novel fusion confinement for space and terrestrial power applications. Dr. Sedwick was the inaugural recipient of the Bepi Colombo Prize, as well as the recipient of an NSF CAREER award on the development of compact helicon sources. He is an Associate Fellow of the AIAA, an Associate Editor of the AIAA Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, and serves on the AIAA Nuclear and Future Flight Technical Committee. Dr. Sedwick received a BS in Aerospace Engineering from Penn State University and M.S / Ph.D. from the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

Presenters

Tom Johnson
Vice President, Engineering
Analytical Graphics, Inc.

Tom Johnson is the Vice President of Engineering at Analytical Graphics, Inc. (AGI) where he splits his time managing key product teams and engineers. He's a subject matter expert in Space Situational Awareness (SSA) problems leads the research and development team integrating new sensors and algorithms into the ComSpOC and AGI's SSA Software Suite and deploying it operationally at customer locations. He leads the Orbit Determination Tool Kit (ODTK) product team where he is responsible for managing the product development, release, and downstream customer support, training, and consulting. He designed and developed the prototypes for AGI’s first enterprise level product focusing on Space Situational Awareness (SSA and managed the initial product release, installation, and support for the first customer deployment. He continues to provide key technical oversight for the product and strategic oversight and vision for upcoming releases. Tom also manages a team of four senior engineers developing new algorithms and standards for the aerospace industry.

 

Lauri Newman
NASA Robotic Conjunction Assessment Manager
NASA GSFC Robotic Systems Protection Program / Code 590

Lauri Newman is a member of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Robotic Systems Protection Program/Code 590. Since 2005, she has managed the Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis (CARA) effort for NASA’s unmanned missions, and serves as the Agency point of contact for Space Situational Awareness (SSA) for robotic missions. Prior to 2005, Ms. Newman spent 15 years as a Flight Dynamics Engineer. She has performed trajectory design for numerous missions including the Earth Observing System missions (Terra, Aqua, and Aura); the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe; Clementine, and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. She holds Masters and Bachelor of Science degrees in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Jim Morrissey
Director, Western Operations
Omitron, Inc

Mr. Morrissey is currently the Director of Western Operations for Omitron in Colorado Springs. He came to Omitron via CSC/DynCorp/GTE/CONTEL from PAGE Communications Engineers. As Implementation Manager, he managed implementation of three US Navy funded communications programs for the Royal Saudi Navy. He managed 13 engineers and technicians in an HF Radioman Rate School program, for the Saudi Naval Expansion Program, and a crew of 33 engineers and technicians on the installation and test of the three-site, shore-based communications system for the Saudi Naval Expansion Program. Prior to that Mr. Morrissey was the Operations Support Lead for the $1.5B Integrated Space Command and Control (ISC2) contract. Before ISC2, Mr. Morrissey held the position of Implementation Manager for the $500M Justice Consolidated Office Network (JCON) program, where he served as the implementation manager for several components of the Department of Justice. Mr. Morrissey served 7 years in the United States Air Force.

 

Robert Rovetto
Ontologist

Robert J. Rovetto is a formal ontologist, space ontologist, and philosopher. He studied ontology during his Masters work, with graduate courses in space studies, having a life-long passion for space. BA studies included an introduction to aerospace engineering, philosophy, and business information technology. His space ontology experience began and continues with concept development and independent work since 2011. Additional ontology experience includes work on disease ontology and causality at the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology; serving as a contributor to an upper ontology in the USA, and work on a medical social entity ontology during his MA studies. Other interests include maritime search and rescue operations; water (ocean, fluvial, etc.) dynamics; astrodynamics, and space visualizations.


Session 1b: Space Situational Awareness

Moderator: Marshall Kaplan, Assoc. Director, Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research

Marhshall Kaplan is a Professor of the Practice in Aerospace Engineering and Associate Director of CODER. He is an expert in space flight technologies, orbital mechanics and space debris issues. In fact, he was the first to study space junk retrieval and was instrumental in the safe reentry of the Skylab Space Station in 1979. He has over four decades of academic and industrial experience, having served as Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University and presented hundreds of courses on space technology and systems. In addition to publishing over 100 papers, reports and articles on aerospace technologies, he is the author of several books, including the internationally used text, Modern Spacecraft Dynamics and Control. Dr. Kaplan is a Fellow of the AIAA and a member of the AIAA Technical Committee on Space Transportation. He holds advanced degrees from MIT and Stanford University.

Presenters

Don Greiman
Vice President
Schafer Commercial Space Situational Awareness

Mr Don Greiman, GM and VP, Schafer Commercial Space Situational Awareness. Over the course of a 30-year Air Force career culminating as the CIO and then Vice Commander of the National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC) and as a civil servant as the leader of NASIC Advanced Programs, Don has provided vision, leadership, and significant strides in organizational effectiveness to highly technical government intelligence organizations. In the ensuing 8 years in industry, he has opened new markets for business of varying sizes and socio-economic status, grown profitability, and increased the performance of employees at all levels. Don has excelled in positions of leadership for teams of scientists, engineers, and technologists, delivering innovative R&D, systems engineering and software solutions, and advanced intelligence analytics. Most recently, he has pioneered the combination of commercial space sensors with space common operational frameworks, modeling and simulation tools, and an open source space catalog to create a space situational awareness that is not Governmental in nature and accordingly, available for sales in commercial and international markets.

 

Christopher Simpson
Doctoral Candidate
University of Alabama

Christopher Ross Simpson is an Aerospace Engineering Ph.D. student at The University of Alabama. He graduated from University of Alabama with a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering in the spring of 2016. Christopher has had a lifelong interest in space exploration. He presented Computational Fluid Dynamics Aided Analysis of the Stability of a Model Single-Stage Suborbital Rocket With 6DOF to an AIAA student conference in April 2016. He led the Alabama Rocket Engineering Systems team in design and construction of a rocket that won 2nd at a regional student AIAA conference. He is exploring the capabilities of a proposed CubeSat network modeling and tracking space debris for analysis and eventual removal purposes. Christopher will graduate in May of 2020 with his Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering.

Roger Thompson
Senior Engineering Specialist
Mission Analysis and Operations Department
The Aerospace Corporation

Roger Thompson is a senior engineering specialist in the Mission Analysis and Operations Department at The Aerospace Corporation. During his 16 years at Aerospace, he has provided space situational awareness and collision avoidance analyses, and real-time operations support to a number of space missions. Thompson performs orbital and trajectory modeling, orbit determination, and formation flying and proximity operations as part of his job. He also supports real-time launch and on-orbit collision risk assessments, on-orbit breakup event analysis, orbit transfer and maneuver planning, and deorbit/reentry analysis. Thompson has provided collision risk analyses for actual or potential on-orbit collisions and developed software used to analyze those events. Dr. Thompson holds a B.S. in engineering science and mechanics from NC State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in engineering mechanics from VPI.

 

Ryan Shepperd
Astronautical Engineer
Deputy Head of Orbital Analysis for Iridium Program
Boeing

Working on the Iridium program for 15 years as a navigation, guidance, and control engineer in orbital analysis and mission planning, Ryan Shepperd has enjoyed the unique challenges and opportunities of operating the world’s only global cross-linked satellite telecommunications constellation. With a strong interest in collision assessment and avoidance, Ryan led the development of tools and processes to assess JSpOC conjunction data and is the lead engineer for collision assessment and avoidance on the Iridium program. He holds Masters and Bachelor of Science degrees in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Colorado, Boulder, and a Masters of Space Studies degree from the International Space University in Strasbourg, France.


Session 2a: Environmental Modeling: Orbital Debris

Moderator: Roger Thompson, Senior Engineering Specialist, The Aerospace Corporation

Roger Thompson is a senior engineering specialist in the Mission Analysis and Operations Department at The Aerospace Corporation. During his 16 years at Aerospace, he has provided space situational awareness and collision avoidance analyses, and real-time operations support to a number of space missions. Thompson performs orbital and trajectory modeling, orbit determination, and formation flying and proximity operations as part of his job. He also supports real-time launch and on-orbit collision risk assessments, on-orbit breakup event analysis, orbit transfer and maneuver planning, and deorbit/reentry analysis. Thompson has provided collision risk analyses for actual or potential on-orbit collisions and developed software used to analyze those events. Dr. Thompson holds a B.S. in engineering science and mechanics from NC State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in engineering mechanics from VPI.

Panelists

Mark Matney
Modeling Lead
NASA Orbital Debris Program Office

Mark Matney is the Modeling Lead for NASA’s Orbital Debris Program Office at Johnson Space Center. He has his B.S. from Texas Christian University in Astronomy and Physics, and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Rice University in Space Physics and Astronomy. He has worked in the field for 24 years, first at Lockheed Martin then at NASA. He has developed a number of important models for NASA, including the ORDEM family of Orbital Debris Engineering Models.

 

Glenn Peterson
Senior Engineering Specialist
Aerospace Corporation

Glenn E. Peterson, Senior Engineering Specialist, System Analysis and Simulation Subdivision, joined Aerospace in 1997. He works on a variety of topics including space debris, collision analysis, meteor showers, and satellite disposal. He has a B.S. and an M.S. in aerospace engineering from San Diego State University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.

Joel Slotten
Space Systems Engineer
Navistel, LLC

Joel Slotten has a PhD in aerospace engineering from The George Washington University in Washington, DC. His experiences include support to the DoD, Intelligence Community and commercial customers as a space systems engineer providing services in modeling, simulation and mission analysis. His work has primarily focused on research and development and has included detailed studies for clients to address issues related to resiliency and survivability of space systems and capabilities.

 


Session 2b: Environment Modeling: Atmosphere and Space Weather

Moderator: Surja Sharma, Senior Research Scientist, University of Maryland, Astronomy Department

Surja Sharma is a Senior Research Scientist and Director of Goddard Planetary Heliophysics Institute in the Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park. His current interests are data-driven modeling of complex systems, space weather prediction, simulations of space plasmas and space debris. He has led many multi-disciplinary teams, including the design and planning of a tokamak experiment and a multi-spacecraft mission to the magnetosphere. Dr. Sharma serves on the editorial boards of AGU/EGU/IGU journals, edited five monographs and published more than 150 papers. He received BS and MS degrees in physics from the University of Delhi and a Ph. D. in physics from Gujarat University.

Presenters

Tim Fuller-Rowell
CIRES Senior Research Scientist
NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center

Tim Fuller-Rowell is a Fellow of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado and a Senior Scientist at NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center. He is head of the Atmosphere Ionosphere Modeling Group and primary developer of the Coupled Thermosphere Ionosphere Plasmasphere Electrodynamics Model (CTIPe). Tim has been involved in the development of several space weather products at NOAA. He was PI of a project extending the US weather model to 600km, creating a Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM), including the coupling with the ionosphere, plasmasphere, and electrodynamics. He was Co-PI on the AFOSR-MURI on Neutral Atmospheric Density Interdisciplinary Research, an effort to improve understanding of the upper atmosphere affecting satellite drag and orbit prediction. He is lead on the Space Weather Action Plan Benchmark on upper atmosphere expansion, an effort to quantify the impact of extreme space weather events on orbit prediction and collision avoidance.

 

Marcin Pilinski
Deputy Director, Space Systems Division
ASTRA, LLC

Marcin Pilinski is the Deputy Director of the Space Systems Division at ASTRA, in Boulder CO. He received his PhD in Aerospace Engineering Sciences from the University of Colorado. His research interests include small-spacecraft systems design, aeronomy, satellite drag modeling, and spacecraft gas-surface interactions. Dr. Pilinski is currently the lead designer of a next-generation, assimilative satellite drag model. As part of this work, he leads the design and implementation of the ensemble Kalman Filter and observation forward models used in the assimilation scheme. Dr. Pilinski’s other research tack involves gas-surface interactions (GSI) in the free-stream and transition regimes as well as the validation of full-physics atmospheric models. This work includes the computation of specific drag coefficient values for aeronomic spacecraft such as CHAMP as well as the evaluation and development of general GSI models appropriate for flight through the earth's thermosphere. As part of this work, Dr. Pilinski has collaborated with surface-chemists to apply measured scattering properties of gases to modeled rarefied flows. Prior to his work at ASTRA, he spent two years working at the Colorado Space Grant as a program manager for the Drag and Atmospheric Neutral Density Explorer research satellite (launched in 2013Q3).

Delores Knipp
Research Professor
Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research

Prof. Knipp’s research focuses on the space environment and atmospheric and solar events that disturb it. She works with students to investigate methods for: 1) understanding variations in satellite drag; 2) describing how structures on the Sun produce disturbances in near-Earth space; 3) improving scientific use of space environment measurements from DoD, NASA and international space missions; 4) inter-comparing measurements from research and commercial satellites with an eye toward making broader use of commercial satellite 'housekeeping' data to monitor environmental conditions in near-Earth space. 5) estimating the conductivity of Earth's upper atmosphere. After a 30-year active duty and civil service career with the US Air Force she joined the faculty at University of Colorado’s Aerospace Engineering Science Department where she teaches CU’s graduate course on Aerospace Environments (She also teaches at an NSF-sponsored summer school on space weather. She authored an upper division-graduate level textbook published in 2011: 'Understanding Space Weather and the Physics Behind It.' She is the Editor in Chief of the American Geophysical Union's Space Weather Journal/Quarterly.

Session 3a: Space Situational Awareness Data Sharing

Moderator: Theresa Hitchens, Senior Research Scholar, Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM)

Theresa Hitchens is a Senior Research Scholar at the Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM).  She focuses on space security, cyber security, and governance issues surrounding disruptive technologies. Prior to joining CISSM, Hitchens was the director of the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) in Geneva from 2009 through 2014. Among her activities and accomplishments at UNIDIR, Hitchens served as a consultant to the U.N. Group of Governmental Experts on Transparency and Confidence Building Measures in Outer Space Activities, provided expert advice to the Conference on Disarmament regarding the prevention of an arms race in outer space (PAROS), and launched UNIDIR's annual conference on cyber security.  Hitchens served as Director at the Center for Defense Information, and was also previously Research Director of the Washington affiliate of the British American Security Information Council (BASIC), where she managed the organization’s program of research and advocacy in nuclear and conventional arms control, European security and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) affairs.

Panelists

Andrew D'Uva
President Providence Access Company

Andrew R. D’Uva is President of Providence Access Company, a government affairs, satellite, and technology consultancy. He has supported international commercial satellite and telecommunications businesses on the regulatory, policy, legal, operational and business fronts for more than two decades. His satellite clients include key communication satellites owner-operators, trade organizations such as the Space Data Association Ltd. (SDA), and Federal agencies. D’Uva conceived the organizational structure, legal framework, and strategy of the SDA, an innovative non-profit, organization whose mission is to ensure safe and responsible space flight operations through appropriate information sharing and analysis with a focus on space situational awareness, operational support and mitigation of harmful interference. He is active in various U.S. government mission and information assurance forums. Andrew D'Uva holds a baccalaureate in government from Georgetown University and a Juris Doctor degree from the Georgetown University Law Center.

 

Jeff Rowlison
VP, Government Affairs
SES Government Solutions

Jeff Rowlison joined SES Government Solutions in February 2015 and serves as the Vice President, Government Affairs. In this position, Jeff is responsible for formulating and implementing strategic legislative and government affairs strategies and initiatives to generate federal support for programs of interest to SES GS while also representing SES GS via a wide array of executive and legislative branch outreach and engagement efforts. Prior to joining SES GS, Mr. Rowlison served over 23 years in the U.S. Air Force in a variety of operational Command and Control, Intelligence and Congressional Liaison leadership positions.

Col. Scott Trinrud
Division Chief of Doctrine and Policy
Plans and Policy Directorate, USSTRATCOM

Col. Scott Trinrud is Division Chief of Doctrine and Policy, Plans and Policy Directorate, United States Strategic Command, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. He is directly responsible for policy development and interpretation in support of the execution of the command's missions through influencing and informing national policy & guidance, and military doctrine. Col. Trinrud attended the United States Air Force Academy. He was commissioned and entered the Air Force in 1995 after receiving a Bachelor of Science Degree in Human Behavior. Col. Trinrud has had a broad range of experience in Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) Space Operations, including Satellite Vehicle Officer, Mission Commander, Operations Officer, 17th Expeditionary Space Control Squadron Commander, Southwest Asia and 4th Space Operations Squadron Commander, Schriever AFB Colorado. Prior to his current position as Division Chief of Doctrine and Policy, he was the Deputy Division Chief Contingency Plans, responsible for USSTRATCOM deliberate plans.

 

Nancy Gallagher
Interim Director, Center for International & Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM)

Nancy Gallagher is the Interim Director of the Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM) and a Senior Research Scholar at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy. Her research agenda involves multi-stakeholder governance of nuclear, space, cyber and other powerful technologies that offer many benefits and raise huge risks of deliberate or inadvertent misuse by state or non-state actors. In addition to her current book project, Strategic Logics for Arms Control, Gallagher has authored The Politics of Verification (John Hopkins, 1999) and co-authored three monographs: Comprehensive Nuclear Material Accounting: A Proposal to Reduce Global Nuclear Risk (2014); Reconsidering the Rules for Space Security (2008); and Controlling Dangerous Pathogens (2007), along with numerous policy reports, articles, and op eds. Before coming to the University of Maryland, Gallagher worked at the State Department and the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. She was the Executive Director of the Clinton administration’s Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Task Force.

 


Session 3b: Mitigation & Remediation Policies

Moderator: Owen Brown, Chief Technology Officer, KTSi

Owen Brown is currently Chief Technology Officer of KTSi, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Scitor corporation. In this role he acts as the lead executive responsible for management, development, and integration of the company’s intellectual offering, enabling and enhancing customer technical objectives. He provides direct support to DARPA and the United States Air Force on a variety of complex space system programs. From 2003 to 2009 Owen was a program manager in DARPA’s Tactical Technology Office, where he led multiple small spacecraft programs, including System F6, and SPHERES. He worked for several years as a spacecraft engineer at Space Systems/Loral in Palo Alto. Owen also served as a nuclear submarine officer onboard fast attack submarines. He holds a B.S. in Engineering Science from Loyola University in Baltimore, and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Aero/Astro from Stanford University.

Panelists

Karl Kensinger
Deputy Chief, Satellite Division
FCC International Bureau

Karl A. Kensinger is a Deputy Chief of the Satellite Division of the FCC’s International Bureau. He began his career at the FCC in 1987 in the FCC’s Mass Media Bureau, regulating radio and television. In 1994, he joined the FCC’s then newly formed International Bureau, where he served as an attorney, as the Chief of the Satellite Division’s Satellite Engineering Branch, and as a Special Advisor and then Associate Chief of the Satellite Division, before assuming his current position.  Mr. Kensinger’s expertise covers a broad range of satellite policy and licensing matters, including areas such as international coordination of satellite networks, radio spectrum policy, and transfers of FCC licenses. He has been the primary FCC point of contact on orbital debris matters since 1995, and was instrumental in the FCC’s adoption of orbital debris mitigation rules in 2004.  Mr. Kensinger is an attorney by training. He is a 1985 graduate of the University of Michigan Law School and a 1982 graduate of the University of Chicago.

 

Brian Weeden
Technical Advisor, Secure World Foundation

Brian Weeden is the Technical Advisor for Secure World Foundation and has 15 years of professional experience in the national and international space security arena. He is a leader for providing critical analysis that supports development of space policy. Prior to joining SWF, Mr. Weeden served nine years on active duty as an officer in the United States Air Force. As part of U.S. Strategic Command's Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC), Mr. Weeden directed the orbital analyst training program and developed tactics, techniques and procedures for improving space situational awareness. In his current role as Technical Advisor, Mr. Weeden conducts research on space debris, global space situational awareness, space traffic management, protection of space assets, and space governance. He is currently Vice-Chair of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Space Security. Mr. Weeden's research and analysis have been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, National Public Radio, USA Today, The BBC, Fox News, China Radio International, The Economist, The World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting in Davos, academic journals, presentations to the United Nations, and testimony before the U.S. Congress.

Todd Master
Program Manager, DARPA TTO

Todd Master joined DARPA in April 2016 as a program manager in the Tactical Technology Office. His interests include space launch, space domain awareness, space traffic management, advanced on-orbit operations including robotic servicing, and space policy associated with all of the above. Prior to joining DARPA, Mr. Master was a mission systems engineer with Orbital ATK, where he was responsible for the development of systems concepts, business strategies, and technical solutions for space situational awareness and other mission areas. He also served as launch operations manager and deputy program director at International Launch Services (ILS), directing commercial space launch integration activities on the Russian-built Proton launch vehicle. Mr. Master holds an MS in astronautical engineering from the University of Southern California and a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering and engineering & public policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

 

Maureen McLaughlin
Vice President for Public Policy, Iridium

Maureen C. McLaughlin is a lawyer and policy expert with more 20 years of experience in industry and government positions, including extensive experience in both the legislative and executive branches of the U.S. government. Ms. McLaughlin’s policy expertise spans a wide range of fields, including technology, telecommunications, energy, tax, intellectual property, trade and spectrum-related issues, among others. As VP for Public Policy at Iridium, she leads the company’s public policy initiatives, including those related to interpretation and compliance with federal telecommunications statutes and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules, and Congressional affairs. Prior to joining Iridium, Ms. McLaughlin held a number of senior level positions on Capitol Hill and in executive agencies, including Senior Counsel to the Senate Commerce Committee, Counsel to Senate Finance Committee and Congressional Relations Officer to the U.S. Trade Commission. Ms. McLaughlin also spent more than fifteen years at the Federal Communications Commission including as Chief of Staff of the Office of Strategic Planning and Policy, Senior Counsel for Law and Policy in the Office of the General Counsel, and as an attorney in the International Bureau. Ms. McLaughlin’s work at the FCC dealt with diverse issues including homeland security, network interoperability, space policy, disaster recovery, spectrum policy, broadcast localism, and international negotiations. She has also been Senior Legal Advisor to the General Counsel to the Department of Energy, where she worked on legal and policy matters including Smart Grid, cybersecurity, and privacy issues. Ms. McLaughlin received her Juris Doctor from Duke University School of Law, and a Bachelor of Arts in Economics from the University of Miami.


Session 4a: International Collaboration Efforts

Moderator: Victoria Samson, Secure World Foundation

Before joining SWF, Ms. Samson served as a Senior Analyst for the Center for Defense Information (CDI), where she leveraged her expertise in missile defense, nuclear reductions, and space security issues to conduct in-depth analysis and media commentary. Prior to her time at CDI, Ms. Samson was the Senior Policy Associate at the Coalition to Reduce Nuclear Dangers, a consortium of arms control groups in the Washington, D.C. area, where she worked with Congressional staffers, members of the media, embassy officials, citizens, and think-tanks on issues surrounding dealing with national missile defense and nuclear weapons reductions. Before that, she was a researcher at Riverside Research Institute, where she worked on war-gaming scenarios for the Missile Defense Agency's Directorate of Intelligence.  Ms. Samson holds a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in political science with a specialization in international relations from UCLA and a Master of Arts (M.A.) in international relations from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

Panelists

Richard Buenneke
Deputy Director of Space Policy
U.S. Department of State

Buenneke advises senior State Department officials on the planning and implementation of diplomatic and public diplomacy activities relating to U.S. national security space policy. He also serves as the co-chair of an international expert group on space debris, space operations and tools for collaborative space situational awareness, which was established in 2011 as part of a United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space working group on the long-term sustainability of outer space activities. Before joining the State Department, Mr. Buenneke was a senior policy analyst at The Aerospace Corporation, where he supported innovative public-private partnerships for enhancing the mission assurance and resilience of commercial space capabilities. He holds a Bachelor’s degrees in economics and systems engineering from the Wharton and Engineering schools of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Buenneke also holds Masters’ degrees in policy analysis from George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs and the Pardee RAND Graduate School.

 

Hiro Iwamoto
Director of JAXA Washington DC office

Hiroyuki Iwamoto joined the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Japan's national aero-space agency, in 2003. Prior to becoming the Director of JAXA’s Washington D.C. office in 2015, Mr. Iwamoto was Head of the Mission Planning Office of the Satellite Application and Promotion Center (SAPC) for JAXA’s Space Applications Mission Directorate. Before joining JAXA, Mr. Iwamoto’s was the Deputy Director for the Paris office of the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), one of three Japanese entities that later formed JAXA. Mr. Iwamoto has a Bachelor's degree in Economics from Keio University.

Jean-Luc Bald
First Secretary Space
European Commission Delegation to the U.S.

 

Jean-Luc Bald is the First Secretary in charge of Space at the European Union Delegation to the United States of America. In his role, he works on cooperation between the European Union and the U.S., in particular for space-based navigation, Earth observation, space research. In his previous role, from 2008 to 2014, he was the Assistant to the Deputy Director General responsible for Galileo, Copernicus, European space policy, and defence and security industries within the European Commission's Directorate-General for Enterprise and Industry. During 2005-2007, he successively held budget officer positions in the European Commission Executive Agency for the "Intelligent Energy" program and the European GNSS (Galileo) Agency. Jean-Luc Bald has 23 years of professional experience in both the private and public sector, including a 3-year period as an entrepreneur. His career includes roles in financial management and in management consulting with a focus on the telecommunications (business creation, re-engineering, spectrum auctions), broadcasting and banking sectors. It took him to France, Germany, Belgium and now the U.S. In 1992, adding to a Bachelor in Finance degree obtained in Strasbourg (France), he completed a Master's degree in Business Administration at the University of Kansas School of Business, USA, after having been selected for an exchange scholarship with the University of Strasbourg.


Session 4b: Re-entry and Debris Removal Liability

Moderator: Daniel Porras, Associate, LMI Advisors

Daniel Porras is currently an Associate for LMI Advisors (Washington, DC) where he advises clients on a wide range of international legal issues related to space activities, particularly in the fields of telecommunications and experimental equipment. Previously, Mr Porras was a Project Manager at the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (Geneva), focussing on outer space security and law. He was also an Associate Officer for UNIDROIT (Rome) where he worked on the Space Protocol, an international instrument for financing space assets. He has held a visiting fellowship at the Observer Research Foundation (New Delhi) and just completed his LL.M in International Business and Economics Law at the Georgetown University Law Center (Washington, DC).

Panelists

Pamela Meredith
Chair, Space Law Practice Group
Zuckert Scoutt Rasenberger

Pamela Meredith has been an Adjunct Professor of Satellite Communications and Space Law at American University's law school in Washington, D.C. since 1989. She advises clients in the areas of Commercial space project planning and implementation; commercial space transactions; risk management and insurance; licensing and regulation; export controls; dispute resolution; and commercial arbitration. Ms. Meredith represents U.S. and European clients in consultations with the U.S. government, including the White House, Congress, Department of State, Department of Defense, and NASA, on space-related legislation and policy matters. She also has obtained bilateral space cooperation agreements for foreign governments. Ms. Meredith has assisted or advised on some aspect of most of the major FCC rulemaking and licensing proceedings for communications satellites in the 1980s and 1990s, including fixed satellite service (C-, Ku-, Ka- and V-bands), mobile satellite service (geostationary, "Big LEO" and "Little LEO"), and position-location service. She has also testified as an expert witness in litigation concerning the interpretation of FCC regulations. Ms. Meredith chaired the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' (AIAA) Legal Aspects Committee (2005-2010). She is a member of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC), Risk Management Working Group. She is also a member of the Cosmos Club of Washington, D.C.

 

Brian Israel
Attorney-Adviser
U.S. Department of State

Brian Israel is an attorney with the U.S. Department of State’s Office of the Legal Adviser for Oceans, International Environmental and Scientific Affairs. In his position with the State Department he acts as an attorney-advisor to subcommittees and task forces, including the Legal Subcommittee of United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. Mr. Israel has authored numerous papers on international law, environmental law and public policy that have been published in such journals as the American Journal of International Law and the Berkeley Journal of Law and Technology, and is a contributing author to International Environmental Law: The Practitioner's Guide to the Laws of the Planet, published by the American Bar Association. Mr. Israel has taught International Law at the George Mason University School of Law. He earned his Juris Doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley School of Law, and a Bachelor's degree in International Studies - Political Science from the University of California, San Diego.

David Koplow
Professor of Law
Georgetown Law

David Koplow specializes in the areas of public international law and national security law. He joined the Georgetown Law faculty in 1981. His principal courses have been International Law I (the introductory survey of public international law topics), a seminar in the area of arms control, non-proliferation and terrorism, and the pro-seminar for LLM students in national security law. In addition, he has directed a clinic, the Center for Applied Legal Studies, in which students provide pro bono representation to refugees who seek asylum in the United States because of persecution in their homelands. His government service has included stints as Special Counsel for Arms Control to the General Counsel of the Department of Defense (2009-2011); as Deputy General Counsel for International Affairs at the Department of Defense (1997-1999); and as Attorney-Advisor and Special Assistant to the Director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (1978-1981). He is a graduate of Harvard College and Yale Law School and a Rhodes Scholar. Most of his scholarly writing concentrates on the intersection between international law and U.S. constitutional law, especially in the areas of arms control and national security and treaty negotiation and implementation.


Session 5a: Mitigation and Satellite Constellations

Moderator: Walt Everetts, VP, Satellite Operations and Ground Development, Iridium
 

Walt Everetts is VP, Satellite Operations and Ground Development for Iridium, where he is responsible for overseeing and monitoring the Iridium network operations and deployment of upgrades to support future system enhancements. Walt started his career working within the aerospace industry with specific responsibilities in commercial communication satellite integration, testing and launch. In 1996, he joined the satellite comms division at Motorola as the manufacturing manager responsible for the delivery and deployment of the Iridium program spacecraft constellation.  After completion of today’s Iridium network, Walt left the Iridium project but remained at Motorola in a new product program management position, where he was assigned to projects in more than 40 different countries and a multitude of different product lines in the telecommunication industry. His primary responsibilities included developing repeatable processes that were used in initial field trials and deployment of new product services offerings. Walt heeded the irresistible call of Iridium again in February 2008 as the Space Systems Operations Director.  He graduated with a BS in Aerospace Engineering from PSU.

Panelists

Doug Engelhardt
Technical Fellow, Manager of Navigation Systems
DigitalGlobe

Doug is Technical Fellow and Manager of Navigation Systems at DigitalGlobe. He started at DigitalGlobe when it was a fledgling startup 20 years ago and has been responsible for designing and building the company’s automated satellite navigation system to support DigitalGlobe’s high resolution and high accuracy imagery business. DigitalGlobe’s satellite constellation spans LEO from 496 km to 770 km altitude. Doug has led DigitalGlobe’s partnership with USSTRATCOM to improve conjunction assessment reliability and robustness for all satellite operators. Doug began his career in the mid 1980s as a Navigation Engineer on the Magellan Venus Orbiter Navigation Team at JPL and still draws inspiration from his time working with the Apollo-era old-timers. He earned a BS in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from Purdue University and a PhD in Aerospace Engineering Sciences from the University of Colorado Boulder.

 

Alvin Alexander
President and CEO
Orion Applied Science and Technology

Alvin Alexander, is a combat veteran with over 23 years of service in the United States Army. In 2013, he founded Orion Applied Science & Technology, LLC for the purpose of becoming the industry leader of on-orbit, risk mitigation services, with an emphasis on orbital asset protection and recovery. With a strong background in systems engineering, he has supported a number of acquisition programs where he advised senior program managers and key leaders as to best practices for system development. Alvin maintains a broad experience base of advance sensor phenomenology’s, and applications. Also, he is a Master of Science Candidate at Johns Hopkins University, Whiting School of Engineering, and possesses a Bachelors of Arts in Aviation, from The Ohio State University.

RIch Leshner
Director of Government Affairs
Planet Labs

Rich Leshner is the Director of Government Affairs for Planet Labs. He has been working in the DC space policy community for 15 years, with experience in the non-profit, government, and industry sectors. During his time at NASA, Rich worked on international projects for collaboration in exploration, managing a $150 million portfolio of innovative small business research, and in the Administrator's office. Rich worked for two years at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, where he supported the development of the 2010 National Space Policy. Rich earned a master of science in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University, and a Ph.D in public policy and public administration from The George Washington University.

 

Tim Maclay
Director, Mission Systems Engineering
OneWeb

Tim is the Director of Mission Systems Engineering at OneWeb, a company preparing to launch the world’s largest satellite constellation to provide affordable, global internet access. Previously he was the VP of Systems Engineering at Orbcomm, where he spent nearly 20 years in the development and operation of the company’s low-Earth-orbit constellation of M2M data communication satellites. He was responsible for the constellation architecture and network performance, and served as the flight dynamics lead for the deployment of 60 satellites over nine launch campaigns. Tim also founded a successful consulting company, has served on technical committees for the National Research Council and NASA’s Engineering Safety Center, and currently serves on the board of the Hypervelocity Impact Society. He began his career with Kaman Sciences, working in the area of space safety research, after earning an MSc and PhD in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Colorado. He also holds a BSc in Physics and Math from Bucknell University, and has over 20 publications related to astrodynamics and orbital debris to his name.


Session 5b: Mitigation Technologies

Moderator: Scott Hull, Orbital Debris Services Group Leader, NASA GSFC

Scott Hull is the Orbital Debris Services Group Leader at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He has worked exclusively since 2002 on orbital debris assessment and limitation issues involving hardware design as well as operations. Prior experience includes two years supporting nearly two dozen operational Space Science missions, five years as a Parts Engineer, and seven years of failure analysis on a wide variety of applications. He received his B.S. in Materials Engineering from Drexel University in 1987. In addition to a number of papers, he recently authored the new End of Mission Considerations chapter for the "Space Mission Engineering: The New SMAD" textbook.

Panelists

Jeffrey Slostad
Chief Operating Officer
Tethers Unlimited, Inc.

Jeffrey joined TUI in 2001, and since then has led planning, design and testing on a number of projects, including several DoD and NASA contracts as well as contracted development efforts in support of aerospace big primes. From early 2000 to February 2001 he was Chief Engineer leading the surface operations team at BlastOff! Inc, a “stealth mode” commercial entertainment venture developing a lunar rover mission with multiple rovers. From 1993 to 2000 he worked at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where he was responsible for the design, development, testing and operations of the robotic arm on the Mars Polar Lander. As Chief Engineer for the Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor science payload, he also led the assembly, test and launch operations for the remainder of the science instruments on the lander. Jeffrey holds MSc and BSc degrees in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the University of Washington.

 

Joseph A. Carroll
President
Tether Applications, Inc.

Mr. Carroll has been involved in space research since 1982, mostly related to use of long tethers in orbit. He proposed the Small Expendable Deployment System (SEDS) and developed it under SBIR and follow-on funding.  This led to the 20 km SEDS-1 and -2 tether experiments in 1993 and 1994, deployment of a 500m wire on the Plasma Motor Generator experiment in 1993, and deployment of NRL's 4 km TiPS tether in 1996.  The SEDS-2 tether was cut 4 days after launch, and TiPS after 10 years.  So he has more reason than most people to be concerned about damage from hypervelocity impact.  Most of his recent work has been on the EDDE tether system.

Luca Rossettini
CEO
D-ORBIT srl

Luca Rossettini is a visionary entrepreneur, seeking a profitable and sustainable expansion of the human kind in space. In 1998 Luca quits his Airborne Officer career and got a master in Aerospace Engineering in Italy (2003). After a year working in a US research lab on nanotechnologies applied to space propellant, he came back to Europe, where, in 2005, he successfully concluded a master in Strategic Leadership Towards Sustainability. During his Ph.D. studies in Advanced Space Propulsion – concluded in 2008 with honors – Luca founded IRTA (startup providing advanced vision and slow motion tracking techniques). In 2006 he co-founded The Natural Step Italia (The Natural Step is an international NGO that helps corporations and communities to pursue their objectives within a strategic sustainability framework), where the idea of applying strategic sustainability concepts to the space sector originated. In 2009 Luca won a Fulbright scholarship and in 2010 obtained a Certificate in Technology Entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley, California. After an internship position at NASA Ames Research Center, Luca Rossettini went back to Italy and founded D-Orbit, developing a solution for Space Debris. Luca loves parachute jumping, scuba diving and eats science fiction books.

 

Scott Hull
Orbital Debris Services Group Leader
NASA GSFC

Scott Hull is the Orbital Debris Services Group Leader at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. He has worked exclusively since 2002 on orbital debris assessment and limitation issues involving hardware design as well as operations. Prior experience includes two years supporting nearly two dozen operational Space Science missions, five years as a Parts Engineer, and seven years of failure analysis on a wide variety of applications. He received his B.S. in Materials Engineering from Drexel University in 1987. In addition to a number of papers, he recently authored the new End of Mission Considerations chapter for the "Space Mission Engineering: The New SMAD" textbook.


Session 6a: Remediation

Moderator: David Barnhart, Director, USC Space Technology and Systems Group

David Barnhart leads ISI’s Space Systems and Technology group, which combines disruptive research with a hands-on, small-satellite design and launch for USC Viterbi students. Barnhart’s specialties include second-generation space morphology design, robotics applied to and with satellites, and application-based engineering capabilities. He works with space experts both on USC’s main campus, via the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC), and with government and commercial space entities. A SERC founder and current director, he previously developed new aerospace and satellite systems and technologies, design tools that dramatically reduce project time-to-completion, and contact dynamic surface platens for full-size space simulation solutions.  Barnhart recently returned to ISI from DARPA, where he was a senior space project manager. Before USC he helped found and lead two space companies, Millennium Space Systems and Germany-based Vanguard Space. Barnhart earned his BSAE from Boston University and his master’s degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute, both in aerospace engineering. Including his previous tenure, he has been with ISI for 5 years.

Presenters

Gysila Danielle Bento da Silva
Security Coordinator
COBRUF

Senior student majoring in Aerospace Engineering at Universidade Federal do ABC in Brazil. As an undergraduate researcher, she developed two scientific projects at her home university during the past years related to Orbital Mechanics. She also spent one year as an exchange student at the University of Southern California, sponsored by the Brazilian Scientific Mobility Program. During that time, she had the opportunity to work as a volunteer researcher at the Space Engineering Research Center, advised by Prof. Barnhart, studying optimal orbital mechanics design and techniques for debris remediation. Besides, she also works on an independent project with aerospace engineering major colleagues called COBRUF in which they work to establish a Brazilian Intercolegiatte Rocketry Competition, something that did not exist in Brazil at the time.

 

Eric Smith
Doctoral Candidate
University of Maryland, Aerospace

Eric is a PhD candidate at the UMD Space Power and Propulsion Laboratory working on mass, velocity, and charge resolved characterizations of the ion and nanoparticle components of laser ablation plumes from common spacecraft materials. He spent 6 years as a flight dynamics engineer at Goddard Space Flight Center, including supporting the super-synchronous disposals of TDRS-1 and TDRS-4, and is now serving as lead engineer for the Space Science & Mission Operations Multi-Mission Operations Center, supporting ACE and Wind and bringing on cubesats including Dellingr and CeREs.

Matthew Marcus
Doctoral Candidate
University of Maryland, Aerospace

Matthew Marcus is a PhD candidate studying orbital debris removal for the UMD Center for Orbital Debris Education and Research (CODER) and the Space Power and Propulsion Laboratory (SPPL). His research focuses on the development of genetic satellite design tools for addressing multiple aspects of the orbital debris problem. In particular, Marcus has conducted research focusing on the identification and safe removal of intact debris objects in low Earth orbit, investigating the cost and risk associated with developing proposed debris remediation concepts to flight demonstration missions. In addition, in association with other graduate students at the University of Maryland, Marcus has performed a preliminary mission design for a demonstration of the "Billiard-Ball" planetary defense method. This strategy uses a spacecraft to maneuver a small asteroid onto a collision course with a larger, potentially Earth-threatening asteroid. Marcus has also worked with the Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office (SSCO) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, where he has assisted in robotic demonstration and test activities.


Session 6b: Remediation

Moderator: David Barnhart, Director, USC Space Technology and Systems Group

David Barnhart leads ISI’s Space Systems and Technology group, which combines disruptive research with a hands-on, small-satellite design and launch for USC Viterbi students. Barnhart’s specialties include second-generation space morphology design, robotics applied to and with satellites, and application-based engineering capabilities. He works with space experts both on USC’s main campus, via the Space Engineering Research Center (SERC), and with government and commercial space entities. A SERC founder and current director, he previously developed new aerospace and satellite systems and technologies, design tools that dramatically reduce project time-to-completion, and contact dynamic surface platens for full-size space simulation solutions.  Barnhart recently returned to ISI from DARPA, where he was a senior space project manager. Before USC he helped found and lead two space companies, Millennium Space Systems and Germany-based Vanguard Space. Barnhart earned his BSAE from Boston University and his master’s degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute, both in aerospace engineering. Including his previous tenure, he has been with ISI for 5 years.

Presenters

Marshall Kaplan
Associate Director, CODER
University of Maryland

Marshall Kaplan is a recognized expert in space flight technologies, orbital mechanics and debris removal methods. He is a pioneer in space debris research, having carried out the first study of space junk retrieval while a professor at Penn State University. Dr. Kaplan has over four decades of academic and industrial experience, and is currently Professor of the Practice in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland. He is also the Associate Director of CODER. His new company, Launchspace Technologies Corporation, has just recently filed a patent application related to economical methods and systems for the removal and control of LEO debris objects. In fact, in Session 6b on Thursday afternoon, he will be presenting some of his insights on how to approach LEO debris field control in order to maintain a safe environment for operational satellites. Dr. Kaplan is a Fellow of the AIAA and holds advanced degrees from MIT and Stanford University.

 

Aurelien Pisseloup
Space Logistics & On-orbit Services
Airbus Space & Defense

Aurélien Pisseloup is the business development manager for the Airbus Defense and Space’s space tug project. Previously, he was the head of the on-orbit services and advanced projects department who was responsible for studying Active Debris Removal activities. Before joining Airbus Defense and Space, Aurélien worked at the European Space Agency.

Kim Aaron
Chief Engineer
Global Aerospace Corporation

Kim Aaron, as GAC's Chief Engineer, advises, mentors, and assists engineering teams on projects involving fluid dynamics and inflateable systems. He has performed numerous wind tunnel tests as well as developed performance prediction models for various aerodynamic systems for operation in the atmosphere of the Earth and other celestial bodies with atmospheres. Dr. Aaron holds patents on a Stratosail (R) Balloon Guidance System for high altitude superpressure balloons, a High Power Solar Array Pointing and Stowing System, and a Gossamer Orbit Lowering Device for removing derelict spacecraft from orbit to alleviate orbital debris generation. Dr. Aaron has taught aerospace courses at both UCLA and California Institute of Technology. He earned both a PhD and MS in Aeronautics from California Institute of Technology as well as B Engineering in Honours Mechanical Engineering from McGill University in Montreal, Canada.